A move is never just a move.

Humans constant place in the universe is “Movement“, and movement is as exhausting as it is rewarding. To grow personally or professionally, you have to embrace discomfort, knowing that discomfort is the catalyst for growth that makes us yearn for something more; something that forces us to stretch, change, adapt, and grow new skin – regardless of our age.

 We had been in our large building for years and years…and years.  It felt like a second home, complete with bedrooms, a shower, 2 kitchens, a huge basement for our non-profit donation program and an upstairs teaching, performance and gathering space that allowed us to share with our clients and celebrate our relationships. 

 We had space to support artists such as the great Nayanhongo family of Zimbabwe sculptors and for our sister non-profit, Living Arts Corporation,to distribute household goods to marginalized families and those afflicted by the Big Thompson Flood of 2013.  The large garage stored Andy’s construction product, The Nailer (www.thenailer.com).

 The building comforted us during the distraught years of the Great Recession, allowing us to shift gears and re-invent ourselves in order to survive and it witnessed co-workers, coming and going in their own lives’ journeys.  Most importantly, the building represented the friendships and respect we built with our clients. It helped us stick to our company’s tag line, “It’s not about technology.  It’s about people”.

 When change tugged at us enough and age forced us to re-examine our goals and practices- we knew we had to move, divest and downsize.  We relieved the burdens of much of our past- throwing away, selling or giving away a mountain of ‘things’. 

 Memories lingered in the air as we filled dumpster after dumpster and truck after truck and decades of history touched helping hands.  Everyone did their part without prodding – and everyone kept the business going, despite days of chaos.

 And now we are here.  It is sweet. 

 Our new office space is filled with the gifted work of clients, friends and co-workers:  Norma Crosby’s bold and bright quilt; an embroidered table runner by Nancy Skaggs; Greig Steiner’s whimsical creations; Collen Nayanhongo’s sculptures; Brian Bigg’s photography, Terry Kohl‘s chevy mailbox, William Newhouse’s oils; Richard Christopher’s nature photography and paintings our son brought us from world travels.  

 We are grateful to Kari Armstrong (a brilliant costume designer) and Don Cox (our UPS driver who kept our spirtis sharp and high) who graciously received our 20 ft. puppets from Trinidad, West Indies.  They had been stored for 17 years and now have the hope of coming alive again. Stalin Tafura, the internationally known sculptor, squeezed in time to load and transport springstone from Zimbabwe that was stored on the property- and somehow we managed to empty the building.

 Our appreciation is heartedly towards our clients.  You were supportive and patient with us during the move.  Thank you.  Our staff?  They didn’t miss a single step and received numerous compliments from our clients during the chaos.  Gary, our mailman, thrilled us with a handmade gift and let us know he’d miss us. Our son arrived in time to do much of the sweat work and filled us with the ability to focus on new projects, patents…and yes, dreams and hopes. 

 We are renewed. We have received something good from each of you.
Our promise to you is to continue serving your technology needs by first understanding and seeing the person on the other side of the interaction.

Cheers.

Andy Pizer et al
Millennium Group LLC

 

Andy Pizer, Managed IT, Millennium Group, millennium group loveland

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