The kids are not all right.

Are smartphones making our kids unhappy? Are we on the brink of the worst mental health crisis in decades?

I

In a recent Atlantic piece, social psychologist Jean M. Twenge explains, in dystopian terms, what’s going on with the generation currently in high school and college. iGens, the generation after the millennials, love smartphones, avoid books, crave safety, avert risk and do not tolerate intolerance.

They do many things less often, including going out with friends, doing homework, working, drinking, participating in extracurricular activities, helping around the house, interacting with their communities- or even going to parties. They avoid exploring outside, spend lots of time in their bedrooms, and are letting their SAT scores slide drastically. They seem to live under a cloud of fear and worse yet, numerous studies are documenting rising rates of depression. They also have difficulty concentrating for more than a very short time. They are impatient. They respond to brief feedback and seldom to lengthy reviews or deep conversations. They want personal attention and customization. They need to know that they are safe and protected.

The actual time spent on smartphones is unnerving. “iGen high school seniors spent an average of 2 1/4 hours a day texting on their cell phones, about 2 hours a day on the internet, 1 1/2 hours a day on electronic gaming, and about a half hour on video chat in the most recent survey. That totals to six hours a day with new media.”

Every generation has its disruption; some more than others. And every generation has its own powerful innovations. iGen was born between 1994 and 2004 and is estimated to be around twenty-three million in the US. activity. They are currently the physically safest generation and the most mentally fragile. What does this mean to us?

“If they can shake themselves free of the constant clutch of their phones and shrug off the heavy cloak of their fear, they can still fly. And the rest of us will be there, cheering them on.” – Jean M. Twenge

What is your iGen experience?

We want to hear from you.

The first five people who send us their observations & thoughts on iGens will receive a hardback copy of iGen by Jean M. Twenge.

Deadline: October 1, 2017

We believe it is vital to try and understand the social, economic and cultural ramifications of the technology we use and service. – Millennium Group LLC

Millennium Group will order and mail 5 books to the winners. Winners and all those who enter agree to allow Millennium Group to publish their entries on social media and our website.

Send Here

Be brief or lengthy. Just express yourself.

Help create the conversation.

 

Andy Pizer, iGen, Jean M. Twenge, Managed IT, mental health, millennium group loveland, smartphone, social effects of technology, social media, teens, www.milpond.com

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